Invited speakers

 

Dr. Fabien Gandon, INRIA, France

Biography

Dr. Fabien Gandon is Senior Research Scientist and HDR in Informatics and Computer Science at INRIA and he is the Leader of the Wimmics team at the Sophia-Antipolis Research Center. He is also a member of the World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C) where he participates in several standardization groups. His professional interests include: Web, Semantic Web, Social Web, Ontologies, Knowledge Engineering and Modelling, Mobility, Privacy, Context-Awareness, Semantic Social Network / Semantic Analysis of Social Network, Intraweb. He previously worked for the Mobile Commerce Laboratory of Carnegie Mellon in Pittsburgh.

Web: http://www-sop.inria.fr/members/Fabien.Gandon/wakka.php?wiki=CV

Abstract: Semantic and Social (Intra)Webs

Monitoring science and technological changes is a vital ability of today's organizations, yet the growing diversity of sources to track in each domain of interest remains a challenge for any organization. On the open web, online communities emerge and build directories of references in their domains of interest at an impressive speed and with very agile responses to changes in these domains.  Inside companies there is a growing interest in importing the tools and practices that made the success of these online communities inside corporate information systems. Blogs and wikis are being set up in more and more intranets.
But, on the one hand, Web 2.0 tools exhibit limits when it comes to automating some tasks or controlling some processes, as usually required in a corporate environment. On the other hand, more structured information systems often suffer from usability and knowledge capture issues.
This talk will report on results of the ISICIL project studying and to experimenting with the usage of new tools for assisting corporate intelligence tasks. These tools rely on web 2.0 advanced interfaces (blog, wiki, social bookmarking) for interactions and on semantic web technologies for interoperability and information processing.

 


Dr. Ton Kalker, DTS Incorporation, USA

Biography

Dr. Ton Kalker received both his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics from the University of Leiden, The Netherlands, in 1979 and 1983, respectively. He has made significant contributions to the field of media security, in particular digital watermarking, robust media identification and interoperability of Digital Rights Managements systems. His research in this growing field started in 1996, submitting and participating in the standardization of video watermarking for DVD copy protection. His solution was accepted as the core technology for the proposed DVD copy protection standard and earned him the title of Fellow of the IEEE (2002). His subsequent research focused on robust media identification, where he laid the foundation of the Content Identification business unit of Philips Electronics (currently Civolution), successful in commercializing watermarking and other identification technologies. Dr. Kalker is co-author on 40+ granted patents, 40+ patent applications and many scholarly publications. Dr. Kalker is currently VP of Security and DRM at DTS.

Web: http://www.linkedin.com/in/tonkalker

Abstract: Digital watermarking

Digital Watermarking technology allows the embedding of auxiliary data within a host signal with minimal impact on the intended use of the signal. As a communication technology it differs from traditional communication technology in that the host signal is not just statistically but also sample-wise known at transmission time. It may therefore appear that digital watermarking is ‘easier’ than classical communication systems. This appearance is misleading: the constraints on digital watermarking systems in terms of capacity, host degradation, robustness and security are such that it is extremely difficult to build highly reliable watermarking systems.

In the context of emerging ecosystems, digital watermarking may play a relevant role in holistically attaching useful metadata to (media) content. In such a context, the security aspects of watermarking become less relevant: whereas in the application for content security it is ‘advantageous’ for a user to intentionally jam watermarking, in the use case of interactivity and collaboration such an incentive is lacking.

In the first half of presentation we give a crash course of digital watermarking, both theory and practice. We also sketch the difficulties of watermarking in its traditional use as a content protection technology. In the second half of this talk we switch gears, and discuss opportunities for digital watermarking as an enabling technology for persistent metadata in multi-entity ecosystems.

 


 

Prof. Kwei-Jay Lin, University of California, Irvine, USA

Biography

Kwei-Jay Lin is Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Irvine, USA. He is an IEEE Fellow and co-chair of the IEEE Technical Committee on Business Informatics and Systems. He was a Chair Research Fellow at the Institute of Information Science, Academia Sinica, in Taiwan during 2007-2008 and a Distinguished Visitor at the Tsinghua University in China during summer 2009. Before joining UC Irvine, he was an Associate Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Springer Journal on Service-Oriented Computing and Applications, and Editor-in-Chief of the Software Publication Track, Journal of Information Science and Engineering. He was Associate Editors of the IEEE Trans. on Parallel and Distributed Systems and the IEEE Trans. on Computers. His research interest includes service-oriented systems, business informatics technology, real-time systems, distributed systems, and operating systems.

Web: http://gram.eng.uci.edu/~klin/

Abstract: Service-Oriented Things: A Service-Oriented Paradigm for Internet of Things

In the past decade, many Internet based applications have adopted the service-oriented architecture (SOA) to enable easy discovery, composition and adoption of services from service providers on Internet. In the mean time, as the wave of Internet of Things (IoT) becomes more widespread and promising, many IoT projects have been conceptualized and explored. Given the vision of IoT is to deploy and connect smart things on Internet, it is natural for us to build smart things as service components and apply the SOA paradigm to utilize smart things in the physical environment to compose cyber-physical services.In this talk, we present the vision of “Service-Oriented Things” (SOT) which will allow us to discover, compose and deploy mixed cyber and physical services by integrating traditional IT with Internet of Things. We also present the WuKong project which is investigating the SoT programming paradigm for future IoT enablement. WuKong has three features that make it attractive on IoT programming: sensor virtualization, service orientation, and user personalization. The WuKong middleware and programming technology make it easier to build smart services that are aware of and responsive to their physical environment.


Prof. Azer Bestavros, Boston University, USA

Biography

Azer Bestavros is a Professor in the Computer Science Department at Boston University, which he joined in 1991 and chaired from 2000 to 2007, culminating in the Chronicle of Higher Education’s ranking of the department as 7th in the US in terms of scholarly productivity. He is the Founding Director of the BU Hariri Institute for Computing and Computational Science & Engineering, which was set up in 2010 to "create and sustain a community of scholars who believe in the transformative potential of computational perspectives in research and education." He is the Co-Chair of the Council on Educational Technology & Learning Innovation, which was set up in 2012 to develop BU's strategy as it relates to leveraging on-line technology in on-campus, residential programs.

Azer Bestavros pursues research in the broad areas of networking and real-time embedded systems. His contributions include pioneering the push web content distribution model adopted years later by CDNs, seminal work on Internet and web characterization, and work on formal verification of networks and systems. As of January 2013, funded by over $18M of grants from government agencies and industrial labs, his research work yielded 16 PhD theses, 4 issued patents, 2 startup companies, and hundreds of refereed papers that are cited over 12,500 times according to Google Scholar.

Azer Bestavros is the former chair of the IEEE Computer Society TC on the Internet, served on the program committees and editorial boards of major conferences and journals in networking and real-time systems, and received a number of distinguished service awards and best papers awards from both the ACM and the IEEE. In 2010, he received the United Methodist Scholar Teacher Award in recognition of "outstanding dedication and contributions to the learning arts and to the institution" at Boston University, and the ACM Sigmetrics Inaugural Test of Time Award for his 1996 paper (with M. Crovella) on the self similarity of Internet traffic "whose impact is still felt 10-15 years after its initial publication.". Azer Bestavros obtained his PhD in Computer Science in 1992 from Harvard University, under Thomas E. Cheatham, one of the "roots" of the academic genealogy of applied computer scientists.

Web: http://azer.bestavros.net/

Abstract: Cloud computing

As the dependence on our society and economy on cloud computing increases, so does the realization that the academic research community cannot be shut out from contributing to the design and evolution of this critical infrastructure.  In this talk, I will present the vision for an alternative model for cloud computing – that of an Open Cloud eXchange (OCX) – a public cloud marketplace, where many stakeholders, rather than just a single cloud provider, participate in implementing and operating the cloud, thus creating an ecosystem that will bring the innovation of a broader community to bear on a much healthier and more efficient cloud marketplace. Specifically, I will focus on the question of how to design mechanisms that deliver verifiable SLA attributes along dimensions of performance, reliability, security, and economic utility, and how to expose tradeoffs along these dimensions to cloud customers in ways that are both practical and usable. I will overview three CloudCommons projects (http://csr.bu.edu/cc) aiming to develop approaches seeking to build trust in the economic utility of IaaS marketplaces. I will start by presenting a periodic model for the expressive specification of elastic cloud supply and demand. This model allows SLAs to leverage a granular representation of cloud resources, exposing flexibilities that enable providers to safely transform SLAs from one form to another for efficient workload colocation. Next, I will show that expressive SLAs facilitate the emergence of an efficient, trustworthy marketplace, by presenting three game-theoretic mechanisms for cloud resource management. The first mechanism enables selfish parties to collocate their workloads in an attempt to minimize the individual costs they incur to secure the shared cloud resources necessary to support their application SLAs. The second mechanism enables rational parties to coordinate their use of a shared resource so as to maximize their individual utilities by creating a marketplace for trading usage rights. The third mechanism enables dynamic pricing of IaaS clouds in a way that ensures efficient utilization of providers' resources, while guaranteeing rational fairness to all customers. For all these models and mechanisms, and in addition to various analytical results, I will present experimental evaluations of deployed CloudCommons prototypes and services that confirm their predicted utilities. Also, I will summarize current efforts aiming to set up the Massachusetts Open Cloud – the first prototypical implementation of the Open Cloud eXchange (OCX), which we are setting up within the Massachusetts Green HPC Center, with over $20M of funding from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and key technology companies.


 

Prof. Youngjin Yoo, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Biography

Youngjin Yoo is the Director of Center for Design+Innovation at Temple University, where he is Professor in Management Information Systems and Strategy, and Irwin L. Gross Research Fellow. Prior to joining Temple University, he was the Lewis-Progressive Chair of Management at Case Western Reserve University. He is also leading the Urban Apps & Maps Studios, which is a university-wide interdisciplinary research and development program for urban civic innovations. His research interests include: digital innovation, design, and experiential computing. His work was published at leading academic journals such as MIS Quarterly, Information Systems Research, Organization Science, the Communications of the ACM, and the Academy of Management Journal. He is Senior Editor of MIS Quarterly, the Journal of AIS, and the Journal of Information Technology, and is on the editorial boards of Organization Science, Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems, and Information and Organization. He was a former senior editor of the Journal of Strategic Information Systems and an associate editor of Information Systems Research and Management Science. He received over $3.5 million in research grant and has worked with leading companies including Samsung Electronics, American Greetings, Bendix, Moen, Intel, Andersen Consulting, IDEO, Gehry and Partners, Lotus, NASA, Parker Hannifin, and Poly One, among others. He is also an adjunct professor at Warwick Business School, UK and is a visiting faculty member at the Indian Business School.

Web: http://www.fox.temple.edu/mcm_people/youngjin-yoo

Abstract

**TAB**

 


 

Dr. Mohammed Ibrahim Al-Suwaiyel, President of KACST, Saudi Arabia

Biography

  • He was appointed Governor of the Communications and Information Technology Commission
    from March 2003 to July 2007.
  • He was the Vice President for Research Institutes at KACST from 1991 – 2003.
  • He also served as Chairman of the Systems Engineering Department, Chairman of Computer Science Department, and Dean of the Computer Science and Engineering College from 1979 – 1991 at King Fahad University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM).
  • Al-Suwaiyel has a B.Sc. degree in General Engineering from King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals and an M.Sc. and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Southern California, USA.
  • Dr. Al-Suwaiyel gave a number of courses in Computer Science, Mathematics and Data Security at The King Fahad University of Petroleum and Minerals University, and at the King Saud University.
  • He published a number of papers in journals and conferences.
  • His research interests include Discrete Mathematics, Computational Complexity, Algorithms and Cryptography.

Abstract

**TAB**


 

Abdulaziz A. Al Sugair, Chair and MD, Saudi Telecom Group

Title: Knowledge Economy - Role of National Telecom Companies

Biography

1972, BSc in Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Univ. of London; 1976, MSc in Electrical Engineering, University of California; US Defense Security Assistance Management Course; Program for Senior Executives, MIT. Through 1990, Officer, Royal Saudi Air Force; retired with rank of Colonel. Former: Chairman of the Board, Al Salam Aircraft Company; President and CEO, Advanced Electronics Company, Saudi Electricity Company, and Tatweer Education Holding Company. Chairman of the Board of Directors & MD, STC Group. Board Member: Maaden Co.; Saudi Commission for Tourism & Antiquities; Saafah Initiative. Council Member, National System for Joint Training.

 


 

 

 

 


 
MEDES News
(November 24th, 2013): The Website of MEDES'14 has been posted.

(July 16th 2014): The camera-ready and registration guidelines are posted online.

(July 17th 2014): The list of accepted papers is published.

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