Tutorial 1 -  A Gentle Introduction to the Dimensional Reduction Landscape, Professor William I. Grosky

Tutorial 2 -  Ubiquitous Computing for High Performance Computing: Parallel, P2P, Grid, and Cloud Computing, Yudith Cardinale

 

Professor William I. Grosky

Chair of the Department of Computer and Information Science, University of Michigan-Dearborn

 
Biography:
William I. Grosky is currently professor and chair of the Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Before joining UMD in 2001, he was professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science at Wayne State University, as well as an assistant professor of Information and Computer Science at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. His current research interests are in multimedia information systems, text and image mining, and the semantic web. He is a founding member of Intelligent Media LLC, a Michigan-based company whose interests are in integrating the new media into information technologies.
Grosky received his B.S. in mathematics from MIT in 1965, his M.S. in applied mathematics from Brown University in 1968, and his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1971. He has given many short courses in the area of database management for local industries and has been invited to lecture on multimedia information systems world-wide. Serving also on many database and multimedia conference program committees, he was an Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Multimedia, and is currently on the editorial boards of many journals in the field.

 

Tutorial Title: A Gentle Introduction to the Dimensional Reduction Landscape
Abstract: Dimensional reduction techniques, both linear and non-linear, play an important role in many machine learning techniques, and have applications in many areas, including software engineering, pattern recognition, and content-based multimedia retrieval. Not only do these techniques improve the running time of many algorithms, but, in many cases, the algorithms produce better results.

In this tutorial, we compare and contrast the many linear and non-linear approaches to this technique.

 

Professor Yudith Cardinale

Full Professor in Computer Science Department at Universidad Simón Bolívar (USB) 

 

Biography: 

 Yudith Cardinale is a Full Professor in Computer Science Department at Universidad Simón Bolívar (USB) since 1996. She graduated with honors in Computer Engineering in 1990 at Universidad Centro-Occidental Lisandro Alvarado, Venezuela. She received her MSc Degree and PhD in Computer Science from USB, Venezuela, in 1993 and 2004 respectively. Her research interests include parallel processing, distributed object processing, operating systems, high performance on grid and cloud platforms, and web services composition, including web and grid semantic. She is the Director of the Parallel and Distributed Systems Group (GRyDs) at USB and coordinates several research projects. She has written a range of publications in areas such as parallel computing, grid computing, parallel checkpointing, collaborative frameworks, and Semantic Web. Her home page is http://www.ldc.usb.ve/∼yudith

 

Tutorial title: Ubiquitous Computing for High Performance Computing: Parallel, P2P, Grid, and Cloud Computing

Ubiquitous Computing is a big scale computing model for sharing resources with the perspective of using collaboration to enhance technology and science. The idea is to aggregate distributed resources, geographically distant, through fast networks to support high performance computing. P2P, Grid, and Cloud computing paradigm are expressions of Ubiquitous Computing, which empower an efficient and cost effective use of distributed computing resources and collaborative work among groups of users and researchers with similar scientific or commercial interests. P2P computing (also called volunteer computing) is based on the use of computers volunteered by the general public to carry out distributed scientific computing. It is a powerful way to harness distributed resources to perform large-scale tasks, similarly to other types of community-based initiatives. The main goal of the Grid Computing paradigm, targeted specifically at scientific research communities, is to transparently offer computing and data resources at the disposal of VO members. A special software layer called middleware takes care of efficient and transparent management of resources. On the other hand, the Cloud computing paradigm, mainly targeted at commercial uses, tries to fully virtualise infrastructure, platform, and applications layers, offering them as services under the so called Everything as a Service (EaaS) model. The main goal is based on the principle of  economy of scale, which establishes that costs are reduced proportionally to the production volume. Parallel Computing is the main  programming model to develop high performance applications. In this talk, I will present an overview of Parallel, P2P, Grid, and Cloud computing concepts, and will conduct practical exercises to introduce the parallel programming paradigm with Message Passing Interface (MPI).

 

 

 

 

 

 
MEDES Information
MEDES'12 conference will be held in Addis Ababa-Ethiopia from October 28th till October 31th, 2012 organized by Addis Ababa University, IT Doctoral Program, Center for IT Research and Innovation (CITRI). MEDES’12 is Co-Organized by the ICT, Science and Technology Division of UNECA ( link: http://new.uneca.org/istd/ )
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